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I am thrilled that the latest project I have been working on with a number of other consultants has now been published.

True Tales of the Trout Cod has absorbed the last 9 months of my life and has been probably the most enjoyable project I have worked on in a very long time.  Will Trueman (author) has written the most amazing book.  He has spent a considerable part of his life studying the Trout Cod in the Murray-Darling Basin. He compiled the science, photographic evidence with the oral histories to match, and newspaper articles from the National Library of Australia’s Trove database to show us what native fish existed and no longer exist in the lower Murray-Darling Basin.

This is the best example of science communicated through story that I have seen.  It has been a great privilege to work with Will Trueman (the amazing author), Siwan Lovett (Director of the Australian River Restoration Centre), Richard Snashall (our brilliant film maker), Vikki Bell (our wonderful editor and indexer), Allison Mortlock (our graphic designer), Melissa Gabelle (our wonderful web designer) and Heleena Bamford (our fantastic MDBA project manager).

I have to admit to being a bit biased as my favourite part of the project was Will telling us about the importance of the National Library’s Trove database. The video link for this can be found here.  Although the story of how the Campaspe got it’s name is the most memorable – I cannot see the name Campaspe without thinking of his story. You will have to read the chapter to find out why !!

I hope you can take the time to explore the new web site and learn so much about the native fish of the Murray-Darling Basin – I feel I have learnt so much from Will and now see our river system with fresh eyes and find I am keen to see our rivers and streams restored and preserved.

Nerida

Over the last 6-8 months I have been working with a wonderful not for profit organisation called the Australian River Restoration Centre.

Australia is the driest inhabited continent, and the continuing drought emphasises the need to better manage our precious water resources. Without water and the river systems that sustain its quality, our rural, urban and unique ecological communities cannot survive. We know that only one third of our river systems are in good condition, another third show clear symptoms of degradation, and the remainder are already in poor condition — and getting worse. We need to act now to reverse these trends.

To be able to ‘act’ people need access to training, education, resources, support and enthusiasm – this is what the Australian River Restoration Centre (ARRC) has been established to provide. People are tired of being moved on to different government programs, processes and people – the ARRC is established on the basis of meeting their needs for the long-term.

The ARRC is a not-for-profit organisation. It’s mission is to:

Support, facilitate and provide opportunities for Australians to work together to protect, maintain, restore and celebrate our riverine environments.

We do this by providing a range of free and commercial services, with all proceeds going back into the ARRC to continually improve, update and invest in the best knowledge, resources and opportunities for sharing information we can provide across Australia. We also have strong international links to the European and Asian River Restoration Centres, as well as with organisations doing similar work in Canada and North America. Read the rest of this entry »

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